Email Analytics for Registrations

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 5.53.28 PMWe have expanded our RunSignUp Analytics Platform to show registrations tied to each email. This will show you in detail how each email you send, and each automated email that is sent (price increases and incomplete registrations for example) performs. This type of analysis will be extended over the coming months to also include transaction $ as well as tracking for other sources like referrals and Facebook Ads. The integrated RunSignUp Analytics combined with the integrated Email system we offer is a powerful combination and begins to show the benefits of a fully integrated marketing platform built specifically for races.

Note: Data only shows for the last month or so since that is how long we have been collecting it. We are of course saving all data now, so next year you will be able to do year over year comparisons.

The example below shows 2 emails sent (the red line) generating 1,952 PageViews and 146 Registrations:

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 5.33.02 PM

The table under the graph shows each individual email and the results of that email. In this example, the first email sent on 9/25 was sent to 5,620 people and has generated 84 registrations. Looking at the graph you can see about 40 registrations happened on 9/25, 37 happened on 9/26 and perhaps another 10-15 came from this email on 9/27. But note a second email was sent on 9/27 and that generated 44 registrations the same day. A lesson from this example is that follow up emails with slightly different messages can be effective (see the two different subject lines with the second email saying “Signup now”.

Let’s look at another example for insights into Automated Emails (emails the system can send out for a race without any intervention). This is a Price Increase Email:

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 5.52.14 PM

In the example above, the race used the Automated Price Increase email. This race had 260 registrations the 3 days before their price increase on 8/31, and 85 of those came from the email – or 33%. While races have always enjoyed the fact RunSignUp gives them automated emails that get automatically segmented by whether a person has signed up or not, the new analytics provides insight into the true value of turning on these features.

Let’s look at another Automated Email – Incomplete Registrations:

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 5.55.31 PM

Over the past 7 days this large race had 57 automated emails sent, which resulted in 138 pageviews and 12 registrations. While that was only 3% of their total registrations during that time period, that 3% (in line with other races we have seen) helps justify the cost of RunSignUp at least :-). And while it could be argued that those people might have come back anyway, the fact is that 138 pageviews is a fair amount of activity based on only 57 emails.

Let’s look at one last example over a 30 day period with multiple emails on a large race:

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 5.57.44 PM

Note in the table, we show 0 recipients for two of the emails because the emails were not sent in the window of time shown in the graph – we are going to change that to show how many were actually sent in the table. The interesting thing is that 921 registrations were generated from an email list of about 13,000 – about 8%. Note also there is a lifecycle to emails – for example the email sent on 9/8 generated views and registrations for the next several days (9/8 was a Friday so some people may not have opened it until Monday).

We hope you enjoy the increasing amount of insights we are bringing to your race with our RunSignUp Analytics engine. We are excited because this is just the beginning as we will be expanding this to show Transaction $, other sources like Facebook and Referrals, and then begin to introduce AI techniques to guide race promotional efforts based on the large data set we are accumulating.

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